Electrosensitivity: Is it Real?

Electrosensitivity is defined as “unhealthy sensitivity (or sensitivities) to a particular source of electricity, for example mobile phones, computers, power lines or even minor electrical equipment. Symptoms are wide-ranging and can include skin problems, headaches, fatigue, fainting, light sensitivity, heart problems and much more. Electrical HyperSensitivity is a name given to those who are severely affected.” (Electrosensitivity.org)

While governments and the medical establishment are slow to recognize this condition as real and not merely psychological, there are sufferers around the world whose lives have been devastated because they could not function in our highly technological world. Sunday Express in the UK recently published dramatic stories of such electrosensitive individuals in an article called “Using Wi-fi has Cost Me My Life.”

Here at EMF-Health.com we talk to quite a few people with this condition asking us for help. While our flagship product and primary recommendation is always the QLink to help strengthen the biofield from the onslaught of EMF/EMR from all sources, we also suggest multiple layers of protection for maximum protection. The BioPro Cell Chip, for example, has a patented technology that is device-specific and addresses the EMR emitted by cell phones, PDAs and Bluetooth. Another layer we always mention, specifically to help reverse existing cellular damage due to EMR exposure, is the use of antioxidants (particularly SOD, catalase, glutathione, and Coq10). EMR exposure is known to cause buildup of free radicals that have been shown in studies to result in both cellular dysfunction, and in interference with normal DNA repair processes. (See Dr. Gerald Goldberg’s book, Would You Put Your Head in a Microwave Oven, for more about nutritional intervention.)

Electromagnetic radiation is not going to go away. In fact, it’s only going to get worse. Don’t wait to take action only when something has gone wrong. It is always wiser to take a proactive and preventive approach.